Album of the Week 01-2017: Stygma IV – The Human Twilight Zone


Sometimes bands are so short of the attention they deserve, that they even surprise me pleasantly when I come across them in my own collection. Because really, Stygma IV’s brand of dark, somewhat progressive power metal is nothing short of excellent. And yet, they’re not exactly a household name. Maybe it’s the fact their native Austria didn’t have the infrastructure for metal that their German neigbors had or simply that they were forced to change their name multiple times throughout their early career. ‘The Human Twilight Zone’ is a true grower: it slowly reveals its dark secrets over multiple listens.

It certainly isn’t the musicianship. Günter Maier is an accomplished guitarist with an audible background in progressive metal, but without all the neoclassical clichés of all of his contemporaries, while Alex Hilzensauer is a true bass virtuoso, but wisely chooses to only show that in small, digestible doses. Ritchie Krenmaier’s voice often strongly enhances the atmosphere of oppression or psychological illness in the lyrics; his expressive voice is clean, but with a distinct raw edge and sounds like a lower pitched version of Metal Church’s Mike Howe. Herb Greisberger stands out because in an era of rapid footwork, he chooses for interesting tom and snare drum patterns instead.

The centerpiece of ‘The Human Twilight Zone’ is the 16 minute epic ‘Sleep’, which never actually feels as long as it does. You can hear the song going through multiple movements of varying degrees of intensity. Again: the composition is marvellous, but it’s Krenmaier who really enhances the intensity. It’s hardly the only highlight on the album though. It’s preceded by ‘The Void’, a slow, ridiculously heavy song with massive guitar riffs. The title track starts off sounding like the band is trying to attempt something more melodic, but turns out to be another typical Stygma IV song: dark, atmospheric and really heavy. Excellent fretless work by Hilzensauer as well.

Luckily, there is enough variation to warrant the album’s 70 minute run. ‘My Failure Reveals’ has a somewhat lighter, more traditional heavy metal feel, though I wouldn’t exactly call it upbeat. This is also one of the songs where Maier’s leads, while very well structured, have an almost improvised feel, which is quite rare in the genre. ‘Scars’ also has a more traditional feel, albeit in a more proggy manner. ‘Why’ and closing track ‘The Way To Light’ are the ballads of the album, but they retain the dark vibe of the rest of the album, which – together with Krenmaier’s spirited performance – makes a true highlight out of the former.

Unfortunately however, Greisberger contracted a back injury some time ago, resulting in the band calling it a day. Maier and Hilzensauer went on to form the very similarly styled Crimson Cult, which is also very worthy of your time, but ‘The Human Twilight Zone’ is one of those instances where all the parts are in the right place. Had they toured with Nevermore or Savatage at the time – both of which are similar to the band in style, but not in sound – they could have made it a little bigger. Because this material truly deserves that.

Recommended tracks: ‘The Void’, ‘Sleep’, ‘Why’

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