Album of the Week 10-2018: Seikima-II – The End Of The Century


Classic heavy metal with a distinct theatrical edge, heavy kabuki-styled make-up on the band members, a downright hideous album cover… We must be dealing with an excellent Seikima-II album. Back in the mid-eighties, when original guitarist Damian Hamada had already left the band, but was still writing most of the material, they were really the only Japanese band that could hold a candle against Anthem if traditional, British-styled heavy metal was what you were looking for. When the band delved into more varied territory shortly afterward, they still delivered quality material, but there is a certain charm to these early songs.

Despite all the borderline ridiculous touches in terms of atmosphere and thematic approach – which I suspect were at least partly parodic in nature – part of why ‘The End Of The Century’ is so good is just because it makes sense. Sure, if you just want to listen to the excellent songs, the little interludes disrupt the flow of the album a little and it does not help that Demon Kogure’s narrations make little sense if you aren’t familiar with the Japanese language, but the songs are actually really good. The guitars sound surprisingly punchy for a 1986 production as well.

If you look at Seikima-II’s setlists throughout the years, you will find that almost every song on ‘The End Of The Century’ became a live staple for the band, with the possible exception of the doomy ‘Kaiki Shokobutsu’ and ‘Akuma No Sanbika’, the latter of which is a beautifully arranged masterpiece of guitar and vocal harmonies and one of the best Seikima-II songs. Even the instrumental opening track ‘Seikima-II Misakyoku Dainiban -Soseki-‘ ended up opening most of the band’s concerts. Sure, only half of it frequently made it to the stage, but the other half is full of exciting riffs and themes.

The remaining tracks are all classics, the best of which being the fantastic title track. It’s nothing too complicated, but its riffs are just classy and effective. ‘Roningyo No Yakata’ is another one that is textbook Seikima-II with its powerful main riff and horror-themed lyrics, while closing track ‘Fire After Fire’ combines the power of a speed metal-styled opening riff and a chorus that refuses to leave your head. ‘Jack The Ripper’ completes the fascination with British metal by employing a British theme in its lyrics. Sure, the actual English lines could have used some work, but the song is energetic and catchy as hell.

While it would be easy to dismiss Seikima-II as a Japanese Kiss ripoff – which, I’m not ashamed to admit, is what I initially did – but they have much more to offer in terms of consistent songwriting. And if it’s consistent heavy metal you want, you can hardly go wrong with ‘The End Of The Century’. ‘Demon’s Night’ is fairly average, but everything else is among the best traditional heavy metal released in the eighties. Don’t let the kabuki appearance and the poor album cover discourage you: ‘The End Of The Century’ is an incredible album.

Recommended tracks: ‘The End Of The Century’, ‘Akuma No Sanbika’, ‘Roningyo No Yakata’

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