Album of the Week 16-2019: Death Angel – Killing Season


Out of all the bands that resumed activity in the wake of Chuck Billy’s Thrash Of The Titans benefit, Death Angel is easily the most relevant today. Where most of those bands rely mostly on nostalgia, Death Angel still releases some of the most convincing and creative thrash metal around. Having said that, I do prefer the band with its original rhythm section. Original drummer Andy Galeon in particular granted a unique flavor to the band. ‘Killing Season’ was the final album for him and bassist Dennis Pepa and it is inexplicably overlooked as one of their best albums.

What makes ‘Killing Season’ so good is how little it is concerned about what style it is. Most of the record is some form of metal, but the lines between several subgenres are blurred, which is probably why thrash purists are not showering the album with the praise it deserves. In a way, it does sort of sound like the hybrid of thrash metal, traditional heavy metal and modern hardrock that Metallica has been attempting on their last two albums, with the most important difference being that it’s actually successful here. Nick Raskulinecz’ production occasionally lends the material a Foo Fighters-ish polish, without forsaking the metallic qualities of the songs.

As for the subgenre distinction, look no further than opening track ‘Lord Of Hate’. It has a thrash intensity, but with riffs that have more in common with more traditional heavy metal. It is hardly the only track on the album for which that is true. The mindtempo stomper ‘Dethroned’ and the more modern, but extremely powerful aggresion of ‘Sonic Beatdown’ are also in between genres. ‘Buried Alive’ relies on a mid-tempo gallop and some of Rob Cavestany’s most effective riff work to date, while ‘Soulless’ combines dark heavy metal with an almost Alice In Chains-ish atmosphere, most apparent in the vocal harmonies of Cavestany and frontman Mark Osegueda in the pre-chorus.

Save for the cool jazzy interlude in the otherwise full-on punk-ish anger of ‘Carnival Justice’, the more experimental material is all on the second half of the album. ‘When Worlds Collide’ and ‘Steal The Crown’ both have an almost rock ‘n’ roll-like vibe in the looseness of their rhythms, while ‘God Vs. God’ is one of those more modern metal tracks that needs a couple of spins to appreciate the brilliance of its tortured atmosphere, not unlike ‘Famine’ on the previous album ‘The Art Of Dying’. Closing track ‘Resurrection Machine’ starts out sounding like it will be the lone ballad of the album, but evolves into a dynamic heavy metal track with a gorgeous Cavestany-sung middle section. With that, ‘Killing Season’ ends on a high note.

Though ‘The Art Of Dying’ was Death Angel’s big comeback, ‘Killing Season’ is the one that proved the band was still relevant. There is a freedom to the band’s songwriting approach here that any of their other albums not titled ‘Act III’ and ‘Frolic Through The Park’ lack, albeit with much more consistency than the latter. ‘Killing Season’ also features what is probably Mark Osegueda’s finest vocal performance to date and a surprisingly natural, yet sufficiently heavy production. In an era of burnt-out seasoned bands and embarrassing acts bands, ‘Killing Season’ is all a fan of interesting thrash can wish for.

Recommended tracks: ‘Soulless’, ‘Resurrection Machine’, ‘Buried Alive’, ‘Sonic Beatdown’

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