My douze points for 2019


Finally. The return of the big, sweeping power ballad in the Eurovision canon. Also, the return of the song that is so bad that it’s entertaining. That doesn’t mean that there was nothing to complain about this year. My favorite song of the semi-final – Ester Peony’s dark electropop song ‘On A Sunday’ (Romania) – got stuck in the semi-finals and I actually think that the folkish but not quite ‘Sul Tsin Iare’ by Georgia’s Oto Nemsadze deserved to have qualified as well. In addition, the idea of “message over music” is really getting on my nerves.

However, let’s focus on the positives. There were actually a couple of good songs this year and Serhat’s ‘Say Na Na Na’ (San Marino) was welcome for multiple reasons. First of all, Serhat being Turkish, this is the closest we’re probably going to get to a Turkish Eurovision entry for a while. But more importantly, the entertainment value is significantly higher than the musical content. Just perfect. We have been needing that for years.

Spain: Miki – La Venda

Is the song order of the Eurovision Song Contest really as random as people claim? Because Miki’s ‘La Venda’ was as good a finale as possible. An energetic, upbeat, sunny pop song that fits the country it’s representing really well. In all honesty, I think Miki may have been better off aiming for this year’s summer hit rather than Eurovision, but I would be surprised if Miki did not gain a massive audience for ‘La Venda’ through his enthusiastic performance. The song is more South American in tone than Spanish, but that should not be any problem. Definitely the perfect way to get the adrenalin pumping one more time before going into the (too) extended voting break.

Concerning that very last bit of the final sentence: in deed, I can’t stand Madonna.

North Macedonia: Tamara Todevska – Proud

Usually, I am of opinion that a good singer cannot save a lesser song. Not that ‘Proud’ is bad, just a little plain, even though it has a bit of an old school Eurovision vibe, with only piano and strings backing Tamara Todevska. I just like the intensity of Todevska’s delivery. She definitely shows some serious range here, both emotionally and musically. There’s some multiple octave work going on and it’s great how Todevska moves from extremely intimate to big and powerful. One thing I find clever is that Todevska and her production team found a way to make the song’s grand message of female empowerment much more personal. Decent song, excellent performance.

Serbia: Nevena Božović – Kruna

Sure, the song is a little messy in the sense that the transitions could have been a little smoother – the pre-chorus in particular is slightly anti-climactic – but Nena Božović’ vocal performance on this is so incredible that it’s easy to ignore that. Not unlike Tamara Todevska, but ‘Kruna’ is slightly better both in terms of performance and songwriting. Bonus points to Božović for writing the song on her own, by the way. Like I said in the beginning, the big sweeping Eurovision power ballad was more prominent this year and ‘Kruna’ is the best example. Božović is a powerhouse singer and her emotional performance really sells the song. She does a lot of dance pop as well, but I think she would do well to focus on stuff where she can really stretch her vocal cords.

Albania: Jonida Maliqi – Ktheju Tokës

After having easily the best singer of the contest in the shape of Eugent Bushpepa last year, Albania once again enters the contest with a great singer and a surprisingly good song. Upon hearing it for the first time, I knew it was not going to win – too dark, too ethnic – but that is exactly why I liked it so much. Jonida Maliqi’s vocal performance deserves all the praise it can get. Some of the notes may sound a little alien to western European ears, but it’s powerful, intense and highly atmospheric. Personally, I love it when Eurovision acts use their country’s folk music as the basis for their song. Especially when it’s translated to a more contemporary environment as well as this. By the way, is this the second time in a row Albania is my top pick?

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