Album of the Week 22-2019: Rammstein – Rammstein


Rammstein’s first studio album in a decade was bound to cause some controversy. After all, controversy follows the band everywhere they go. Sometimes it’s their provocative – but often really funny – videos and lyrics, but their untitled seventh album may just cause a rift among their fan base. On one hand, the music is Rammstein as one would expect them to be, with their trademark militaristic rhythms and blunt, simple guitar riffs firmly in place. However, as a whole, the album is also notably more melodic than most of their previous material. But is ‘Rammstein’ really worth the wait?

Whether or not that is the case depends on your taste, but I think it is a more than admirable effort. It would have been easy for the band to pump out another typical Rammstein album, but with it being the first one in ten years, they seemed aware of the fact that something different was desired. For the first time ever, the band worked with a different producer than Jacob Hellner, though Olsen Involtini has worked with the band in the past. He seems to favor Christian ‘Flake’ Lorenz’ keyboards, because they are significantly more prominent, though fortunately not at the expense of the guitars.

The first singles may not have given the impression that ‘Rammstein’ would move in a slightly different direction. ‘Deutschland’ and ‘Radio’ are both strong metallic rock songs with anthemic choruses and lyrics clearly rooted in the band’s East German history. The pseudo-symphonic metal of ‘Zeig Dich’ sounds somewhat familiar as well, although that one clearly shows Involtini’s experience as a string aranger. In addition, Till Lindemann’s vocals – which I still think are not as appreciated as they should be by “serious” music media – are allowed a larger range of singing styles and emotional expression than ever before.

Further into the album, the experimentation is turned way up. ‘Was Ich Liebe’, ‘Weit Weg’ and ‘Ausländer’ are among the poppiest Rammstein tracks to date. The latter was initially too electronic for my taste, but it’s a grower. ‘Diamant’ is an absolutely gorgeous acoustically-based ballad. One of the true highlights is ‘Puppe’, which moves from a dark ballad to nightmare fuel with Lindemann going absolutely mental in its chorus. It kind of feels like an even darker stylistic sequel to ‘Stein Um Stein’. The first person perspective child abductor story of ‘Hallomann’ is another brilliant theatrical move with a nice and dirty bass line courtesy of Oliver Riedel.

Out of the more typical Rammstein track, the big, Black Sabbath-infused groove of ‘Sex’ is surprisingly effective. ‘Tattoo’ is lyrically hilarious, but it feels a little lost in the shuffle between all the experimentation going on during the second half of the album. Hardcore fans of the first two albums may scratch their heads upon hearing ‘Rammstein’, but the truth is that the album is a pretty logical progression from everything the band did from ‘Mutter’ onward. The riffs, rhythms and clever, at times laugh out loud funny lyrics are still there. There is just a slightly different polish this time around, which I’d say is a welcome experiment.

Recommended tracks: ‘Puppe’, ‘Zeig Dich’, ‘Hallomann’, ‘Radio’

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