Album of the Week 30-2019: Audioslave – Revelations


It is truly unfortunate that Audioslave never got to record more than three albums. They started out like any other supergroup; as musicians struggling to find a way to combine their musical histories in a listenable manner, although the self-titled debut certainly already had its share of great moments. It helps that 75 percent of Audioslave came from the same band, but by the time ‘Revelations’ was released, the band had evolved beyond sounding like Rage Against The Machine with Chris Cornell singing. This is a powerful, at times surprisingly soulful alternative hardrock album that showcases some excellent songwrited and spirited musicianship.

Rage Against The Machine’s biggest strength, to me, was always their rhythm section, but ‘Revelations’ is the record on which drummer Brad Wilk and bassist Tim Commerford deliver their best performance yet. Their rhythms can still punch hard if they want to, but there is a strong soul and funk undercurrent on the album. As a result, guitarist Tom Morello is forced to tone down his noisy effects in favor of a more swinging rhythm guitar approach, ending up sounding something like Led Zeppelin being pushed through a Motown filter. An approach that fits Cornell’s wide, expressive range like a glove.

The opening title track briefly misleads the listener into thinking ‘Revelations’ will be a moody, downbeat album, but the song quickly transforms into a powerful swing ‘n’ stomp fest. And while ‘Revelations’ as a whole is a tad darker in tone than the first two Audioslave albums – to its benefit, if you ask me – it also has its notably celebratory moments. ‘Original Fire’, most notably, ironically sounds more upbeat than the early Seattle bands it is a tribute to. ‘One And The Same’ and the amazing funk rocker ‘Broken City’ manage to walk the tightrope of dark, dangerous and life-affirming effectively.

And yet, the most convincing moments on ‘Revelations’ are the most melancholic ones. ‘Wide Awake’ is easily my favorite non-Soundgarden song Cornell has ever sang on. It could be described as a sorrowful ballad, were it not for Commerford’s busily funky bass line and Wilk’s dynamic drum work. The yearning chorus and the climactic ending are pieces of art. Closing track ‘Moth’ is another gloomy masterpiece driven by a massive, almost Sabbathian riff and a haunting chorus. Elsewhere, the pounding ‘Shape Of Things To Come’ and the almost jazzy chord work of ‘Nothing Left To Say But Goodbye’ run a different way with the melancholy. ‘Jewel Of The Summertime’ is one of the heaviest funk tracks I ever heard.

‘Out Of Exile’ was a great album, but ‘Revelations’ is the Audioslave album I would recommend anyone to start with, as the specter of the members’ former bands was no longer looming over the band by this point. The backgrounds of the musicians are fairly obvious, but the blend of styles is rather unique. Audioslave had finally found its own sound on ‘Revelations’, which is why it is such a pity that it was their final album. Certainly one of the most organic-sounding big budget post-2000 rock releases and that is truly the finishing touch of this great album.

Recommended tracks: ‘Wide Awake’, ‘Moth’, ‘Broken City’, ‘One And The Same’

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