Posts Tagged ‘ guitar ’

Get your jazz on with Gitarist!


Having done six interviews at the North Sea Jazz festival in July, there’s a serious focus on jazz in this month’s issue of Gitarist. If you see only five, that’s because we will feature Belgian jazz legend Philip Catherine in a larger article in next month’s issue – you heard it here first!

That doesn’t mean this month’s artists are not worth reading about. What about widely beloved guitarist Bill Frisell? I had the opportunity to talk with this extremely friendly musician about his massive discography. Also, after being impressed thoroughly by Roosevelt Collier’s unconventional work on the lap steel with Bokanté last year, we could not pass up upon hearing he played the festival again. Oz Noy and Adam Rogers are big names in modern fusion and Pascal Danaë combines delta blues and Guadeloupian sounds in this remarkably full-sounding trio Delgres. If you want to know more about their sounds and approaches, these interviews are the way to go.

Besides that, we have a large special about improving your guitar playing technique, my colleagues have spoken with Guthrie Govan and The Pineapple Thief and there are loads of album and gear reviews. That should still your guitar appetite until the next issue.

Advertisements

Surprisingly metallic contributions to this month’s Gitarist


My contributions to this month’s issue of Gitarist have been surprisingly metallic. Balance is delivered by other authors’ pieces this month. First off, I had an interview with Rafael Bittencourt and Marcelo from Angra about their fantastic new album ‘Ømni‘. We talked about more interesting stuff than the article allowed room for, so please stay tuned: everything else we talked about will be published about in English on this very weblog later this week. Furthermore, the interview I had with Spoil Engine guitarists Steven ‘Gaze’ Sanders and Bart Vandeportaele is published with two live photos I took in his month’s guitarist.

And most relaxingly, I have taken the time to talk with Merel Bechtold, my friend of many years, about the recording of Purest Of Pain’s album ‘Solipsis’. Many years ago, we gigged together a couple of times, so it already seems like Purest Of Pain has been around forever, but due to her busy gigging schedule with Delain and Mayan, she finally found the time to finish the album. It sounds good; everyone who likes modern, Scandinavian style melodic death metal should certainly give the album a spin. You will not regret it.

Moreover, Michael Landau talks with us about his thoroughly enjoyable new album ‘Rock Bottom’ and there are loads and loads of gear reviews and background articles. If guitars and guitarists interest you and you can read Dutch, I can’t advise you enough to check this thing out. It is in stores now.

Interview: Tomoyasu Hotei wants to create something extraordinary

Recently, I’ve been given the opportunity to interview legendary Japanese guitarist Tomoyasu Hotei. What follows is a translation of the article I have written in Dutch for The Sushi Times. Should you be proficient at Dutch, I would strongly recommend you to read the original arctile.

In Japan, Tomoyasu Hotei reached a legendary status at quite a young age due to his work with the massively popular Boøwy. After that band split up in the late eighties, he worked with superstars like Iggy Pop, Rammstein guitarist Richard Z. Kruspe and his hero David Bowie and recently, he decided to pursue his international ambitions by relocating to London. In April, he will tour through Europe.

Since I moved to London, I learned why Japan is described as ‘the Far East’“, the 55 year old guitarist says. “Japan is very well organized, very safe and the food is great, but everything is executed within the country. People tend to look only inward. I have dreamt to explore the outside world, but one day I realized that you have to be based outside of Japan to seize that opportunity. Luck will not come to you; you have to approach it. You may have some access to the outside world through the internet, but if you are looking for a more authentic experience, you have to live and breathe on the same ground that you want to approach. I feel convinced that I have made the right decision.
Hotei has already taken note of the conveniences of living in the west. “If you want to fly from Japan to the Netherlands, it takes twelve hours“, he states. “But from London, it only takes two hours. That itself makes me feel that I’m closer to the rest of the world. Also, it’s the best way to learn a language; way better than learning it at school. True, it is very cold and miserable during the winter, but summer is heaven! If I had stayed in Japan, I may not have had this opportunity to play to Dutch people.

Visual consciousness

In the early eighties, Boøwy stood out due to their approach that was influenced – both musically and aesthetically – by new wave, glamrock and post-punk. “Even before the term “visual kei” was created, I was always conscious about visuals“, he explains. “Perhaps we were the original visual kei band? X Japan, Buck-Tick and Miyavi weren’t yet established back then. Back in those days, I had spiky hair with heavy make-up, guaranteed to catch people’s attention in the streets!
I am a huge fan of David Bowie and have been influenced by his music throughout my career. But he was inspired by kabuki. He used visual techniques to create unusual atmospheres on stage. I too wanted to created something extraordinary and by wearing make-up, I felt like I had another identity. I thought by adding some fantasy to rock music, it would create more depth in the music.
My visual consciousness hasn’t changed and I still care about artwork and stage plots. However, because I have now ‘matured’, I can’t do anything too crazy anymore; I am nervous that my daughter won’t talk to me anymore if I did, haha!

Trust

Japan seems to have a bigger market for “strange” bands. Hotei seems to notice this as well. “You can’t find a band like Babymetal in Europe“, he thinks aloud. “And the music market in Japan is dominated by domestic bands who make up something like ninety percent of the total market. Perhaps it is more competitive there; people have to be experimental and make it original. In Europe, I think there are distinctive genres of music. Therefore, my impression of the music audience there is something like jazz fans who will not be interested in rock and metal fans who are not interested in techno.
My audience in Japan is very special. There’s a level of trust we have built over the years. To those who are not familiar with my audience and see 10,000 people singing and dancing along with my performance, it is almost like a cult group. That makes me a preacher! The size of my crowds in Europe and the USA is relatively small, but I genuinely enjoy playing in such an intimate setting. It is so raw; it reminded me of when I started thirty five years ago. I can feel the grip on the people as they are up on their feet and that means I’m doing something right. Also, it’s great to see Japanese people in the audience; it makes me feel at home, away from home.
I think this is still a trial period, but those people who may not be familiar with me, trust me, you will get your money’s worth! I am always eager to share my music with people who have no clue who I am or have never heard my music before. I want to show my ability to entertain them with a danceable guitar sound and performance. I am confident that my live performance is the most effective way to describe myself. Once you see my performance, people will see how unique I am.

In April, Hotei will tour through Europe for about a week and a half. During this tour, he will play in the Netherlands twice and in Belgium once. “I love Amsterdam“, he states enthusiastically. “I thoroughly enjoy my last year’s visit. For those who were there last year, I can guarantee this year’s show will be even better. I have a slightly different band this year, bringing my longstanding drummer from New York, Zac Alford, who some may know from his work with Bowie, and my keyboard player Okuno from Tokyo, as well as my old friend and musical collaborator Noko. It’s a truly international band!

Recognize

I’ve released over twenty studio albums as a solo artist“, Hotei says. “Which is a lot! I know now for a fact that the Japanese market is very quick to move from one album to the next. In Japan, you release an album followed by fifty plus shows each time. It was actually my routine. My international debut ‘Strangers’ was released in October 2015 and I have just started writing for my second international album in February. ‘Strangers’ is a great album, but I’m committed to making a “greater” album.
My inspiration is based on my guitar. It is an endless journey; the potential is infinite. That’s the beauty of the guitar, I think. I have always been persistent to create guitar sounds that people will recognize as my sound. I’m now discovering digital technology and have been using a digital amp lately. But ultimately, I think it’s not the equipment that makes my sound so unique, I think it is coming from my playing style.

The list of artists that Hotei has worked with is enormous. Are there any people left on his wishlist? “I consider myself against the luckiest in the world to have performed with David Bowie, The Rolling Stones and Roxy Music“, he smiles. “Also, it was a great honor to collaborate with Iggy Pop, Brian Setzer and Zucchero from Italy. If I may blow my own horn, I was able to grab these great collaboration opportunities because I am a very skilfull guitarist. I am very flexible and I enjoy making singers feel very comfortable.
My door is always open to more opportunities. Not just with legendary artists, but also talented upcoming new artists. My guitar riffs are very catchy, so perhaps I can collaborate with hiphop artists too. I’d love to have the chance to play with Beyoncé! I’m very interested in St. Vincent’s music too. What about a great artist from the Netherlands? Maybe you can introduce me!

My Epica cover story in stores now!


Early this year, I said I didn’t have cover stories for a long time and today, my third one of the year is in stores. And it’s one that was fun to do as well; I sat down with Epica guitarists Mark Jansen and Isaac Delahaye to talk about their brand new album ‘The Holographic Principle’, on which they have – for the first time – used actual orchestral instruments only. If you’re curious how that influenced the guitar work on the record, go check out Gitarist now. My experiences with Isaac, Mark and the entire management team of Epica have been incredibly pleasant, so this was a breeze to prepare and write. And there’s more where that came from, but more on that later…

Aside from a vast amount of gear features – one of which is an interesting story on the 70th anniversary of Australian guitar manufacturer Maton – there’s some more interviews. One of which is the interview I had with Belgian Blues man Shakedown Tim, but be sure to check out the lengthy Blues feature with Billy Gibbons, Robben Ford, Walter Trout, Lance Lopez and – surprisingly – Steve Lukather as well.

In addition, the reviews section was remarkably hard to do this month, as we only have two pages and September 30th this year is by far the most popular release date I have experienced in almost eight years of being a professional music journalist. But we did it! King Of The World’s fresh new album ‘Cincinatti’ is our album of the month, but there are also amazing new releases by the likes of Marillion, the Ruben Hoeke Band and my favorite Blues lady of the world: Joanne Shaw Taylor.

Get it now, while it still has that amazing new magazine smell!

In Memoriam Prince 1958-2016


Call him weird. Call him an enigma. Call him a show-off. You’re probably right. But let’s never forget that Prince was first and foremost a musical genius who consistently refused to aknowledge the presence of genre boundaries in music. The announcement of his death came as a shock to me. Not only because have been a big fan of his work for ages, but also because I had no idea his health issues were so bad. He was rushed to the hospital in the middle of a tour last week, but he was back home and everything seemed to be alright. However, it was that home – Paisley Park, of course – where he was found dead at age 57.

I had the pleasure of seeing “the purple one” live when he closed the second night of the North Sea Jazz festival in 2011. It was an extremely hectic night as I was still fronting Chaos Asylum at the time and we had a gig before the show, but I’m still so glad I went. The Prince I saw there wasn’t Prince the Pop phenomenon or Prince the hit machine, but the musician Prince. Exactly the side of him that I admire so much. With a passion, he and his excellent band worked through a set of Jazz, Funk, Soul and even a little Hardrock. And whatever amazing song I missed that night – ‘Controversy’ first and foremost – I had a chance to see two weeks later at the same venue.

There’s so much to admire about Prince that I don’t even know where to start. Maybe his guitar playing, because I still think he doesn’t get enough credit for his amazing skills. He blends Hendrix’ intuitive Blues feel with Santana’s sultry tone and soulful melodicism, while adding his own awesome choppy, syncopated funk and the occasional shred moment to the mix. There’s not one player in the world who sounds like him sonically or stylistically and that to me is the mark of a great guitarist.

But he’s a fantastic composer as well. He’s made futuristic Funk (‘Controversy’), psychedelic Bluesrock (‘Colonized Mind’), relaxed Jazz (most of ‘The Rainbow Children’), excellent power ballads (‘Gold’), Hardrock (‘Peach’), his trademark light Funk (‘Dear Mr. Man’), T-Rex-ish Rock ‘n’ Roll (‘Cream’) and the perfect Pop song (‘Little Red Corvette’). And I’m probably forgetting a whole lot more here, but so much of his work is simply uncategorizable. What, for instance, is ‘When Doves Cry’? I wouldn’t know either, but it’s excellent without any shade of a doubt.

While Prince’s work is never too far away from my CD player – litterally actually; it’s right above it – I think this is a good time to pay tribute by playing even more of his work. There’s so much great material that he has made through the years. From the heavily bootlegged, yet never officially released Funk Bible that is ‘The Black Album’ to the Hardrock splendor of ‘PlectrumElectrum’ that he recorded with his all-female backing group 3rdEyeGirl… This stuff needs to be heard. It’s just a pity that nothing more will ever be made. I will be looking forward to the release of ‘HitnRun Phase Two’ next week though…

Prince Rogers Nelson, I’ve stood up to defend your musical qualities numerous times through the years and I will continue to do so. Your contributions to Pop music will be sorely missed.

My interview with Vicente Amigo available online


For those of you who were curious about my interview with Flamenco legend Vicente Amigo, but didn’t get around to buying Gitarist, the interview is available online in an edited version through the World Music Platform Mixed. To be exact, the interview can be viewed right here.

My apologies for all you international Flamenco aficionados: the interview is in Dutch. Also, the article in Gitarist contains an additional in-depth view on his guitar, built by Mexican luthier Francisco Navarro. If that’s the sort of thing you’re looking for, you’ll really have to learn Dutch and get the magazine instead. However, this article still reflects the pleasant and informative interview I had with Amigo quite well.

Enjoy and please feel free to drop a line!

Steve Hackett and much more in Gitarist


About a month and a half ago, former Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett and myself had a very interesting conversation about his recent ‘Genesis Revisited’ projects, his never ending search for sonic innovation and his technical and melodic development through the years. The resulting article has now been published in Gitarist and also includes a portrait I took of Hackett. Hackett is one of my absolute favorite guitarists because of his unmatched sense of melody and the interview was one of my best yet, because of his intelligence and British humor. This issue of Gitarist should be in stores today, so be sure to check it out.

Other articles from my hand include an interview with My Baby, a Dutch trio that combines Delta Blues riffs with soulful vocals, dark grooves and a hypnotic atmosphere reminiscent of the Voodoo music of the southern states of the US, and a studio report with the Dutch psychedelic Rock sensation DeWolff – also a trio coincidentally. DeWolff recently recorded their impressive fifth release ‘Grand Southern Electric’ with producer Mark Neill, whose work with The Black Keys on ‘Brothers’ was awarded with a Grammy Award. Mark Neill and I also had a nice conversation about these recordings, which is published in Interface, also in stores today!

Advertisements