Posts Tagged ‘ Kristoffer Gildenlöw ’

Album of the Week 03-2018: Kayak – Seventeen


Kayak is one of the few bands who can keep changing musicians and still sound like Kayak. ‘Seventeen’ is the ultimate proof. Only founding keyboard player Ton Scherpenzeel remains from the last album, yet it is the most inspired set of songs Kayak has released in at least ten years, possibly even as much as three and a half decades. In a time when progressive rock fans have to count on affectionate retro bands, Scherpenzeel is one of the originators of the genre still laying down some amazing, symphonically tinged progrock compositions with a passion that is nothing less than admirable.

Despite being the sole composer of these songs, Scherpenzeel is not the only one who deserves credit for how good ‘Seventeen’ is. The eighties inspired guitar heroics of Marcel Singor – along his gorgeous tone – really make this material come to life and give it the rock edge that some of the band’s most popular songs lack. The difference on the vocal front is notable too; Kayak no longer has a male-female vocal duo. Instead, Bart Schwertmann has a passionate, almost theatrical vibe that fits Scherpenzeel’s compositions really well. Some may miss Edward Reekers’ warm delivery, but as far as prog rock singers go, this is excellent.

With ‘Seventeen’ being a progressive rock album, there are some long songs that move through several moods and atmospheres without sounding incoherent. ‘Walk Through Fire’ is one of those moments, which starts out almost intimate before entering a highly memorable section with fairly obvious Celtic influences and builds from a dark middle section to a bombastic finale. Another one of the epic suites, ‘La Peregrina’, has an almost classical elegance, while the shortest of the three, ‘Cracks’ feels like a more traditional progressive rock song with some amazing fretless bass work courtesy of Kristoffer Gildenlöw (ex-Pain Of Salvation).

If Kayak has proven anything through the years, however, it’s that their shorter, more concise song are no less interesting than the longer ones. And that doesn’t just concern the short instrumentals, like ‘Ripples On The Water’, which features some beautiful lead guitar work by Camel’s Andy Latimer. Opening track ‘Somebody’ has a Queen-like feel to it and some really strong melodies, while ‘Feathers And Tar’ has a great chorus an some of the most propulsive rhythms on the album. ‘All That I Want’ is a flawless pop song and the appropriately titled ‘To An End’ is a beautiful, heartfelt ballad like only Kayak can do them.

Though Kayak’s compositions are never less than good, I tend to prefer the material on which the guitars and the keyboards are in perfect balance. In addition, the fact that ‘Seventeen’ was conceived with the idea that a band should play it rather than being a studio project, the material just sounds a little more “alive” than usual. Everyone involved obviously plays their heart out and it is that simple fact that makes these compositions, which were already good to begin with, just a little bit better. Highly recommended for progressive rock fans, both traditional and contemporary.

Recommended tracks: ‘Feathers And Tar’, ‘Somebody’, ‘La Peregrina’

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